Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden 0
Culture shock when arriving in Sweden 0

Madeline Robson, 30 years old, Canadian and living in Sweden.

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

The first thing that surprised Madeline Robson was that parents in Sweden get up to 120 days off a year and still receive a salary to stay home and take care of their children when they are sick.

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

In this Nordic country, tipping restaurant servers is not mandatory like America, because they are paid fairly.

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

The next thing that surprised the young girl was knowing that parents do not have to prepare lunch for their children when they go to school, nor do they need to pay money so their children can eat.

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

She was shocked when she saw adults entering the house, and `forgetting` children sleeping in strollers outside on the porch, even in winter.

Culture shock when arriving in Sweden

Her Swedish friends don’t have air conditioning in their homes.

People bathe in ice water in subzero weather.

Local people highly respect each individual’s privacy.

What also surprised her was that the people spoke English very well.

People walk, jog, push strollers, walk dogs, or even meet friends in cemeteries.

Sweden has naming laws.

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